twoquickdeaths:

The front pattern does move – and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it!

Sometimes I think there are a great many women behind, and sometimes only one, and she crawls fast, and her crawling shakes it all over.

Then in this very bright spots she keeps still, and in the very shady spots she just takes hold of the bars and shakes them hard. 

And she is all the time trying to climb through. But nobody could climb through that pattern – it strangles so; I think that is why it has so many heads. 

They get through, and then the pattern strangles them off and turns them upside down, and makes their eyes white!

If those heads were covered or taken off it would not be half so bad.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkin Gilman

twoquickdeaths:

The front pattern does move – and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it!

Sometimes I think there are a great many women behind, and sometimes only one, and she crawls fast, and her crawling shakes it all over.

Then in this very bright spots she keeps still, and in the very shady spots she just takes hold of the bars and shakes them hard. 

And she is all the time trying to climb through. But nobody could climb through that pattern – it strangles so; I think that is why it has so many heads. 

They get through, and then the pattern strangles them off and turns them upside down, and makes their eyes white!

If those heads were covered or taken off it would not be half so bad.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkin Gilman

santonyminspired:

The sexual nausea associated with all these monster-women helps explain why so many real women have for so long expressed loathing of (or at least anxiety about) their own, inexorably female bodies. The “killing” of oneself into an art object – the pruning and preening, the mirror madness, and concern with odors and aging, with hair which is invariably too curly or too lank, with bodies too thin or too thick – all this testifies to the efforts women have expended not just trying to be angels but trying not to become female monsters. 

Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, “The Madwoman in the Attic" 

santonyminspired:

The sexual nausea associated with all these monster-women helps explain why so many real women have for so long expressed loathing of (or at least anxiety about) their own, inexorably female bodies. The “killing” of oneself into an art object – the pruning and preening, the mirror madness, and concern with odors and aging, with hair which is invariably too curly or too lank, with bodies too thin or too thick – all this testifies to the efforts women have expended not just trying to be angels but trying not to become female monsters. 

Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, “The Madwoman in the Attic"